Buddenbrooks
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
205X130 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book of Thomas Mann– Original language
Permanent Exhibition at the Museum of the writing and the sign in Turin

About the Novel – This novel tells about the life of the Buddenbrooks, a wealthy and notable family of Lübeck which, through four generations, radically changes its character and its social and economic situation, going through times of prosperity and then financial difficulties, until the final ruin arrives.

Description of the painting– This is the artwork in which more immediate appears the relationship between literary text and image. In this work is depicted a carpet. The structure and the state in which the carpet appears (intact and compact in its upper part, threadbare in the middle and gradually holed and fringed at its end) represents a figurative synthesis of the plot of the novel, namely the rise, the consecration, the progressive social and economic fall and then the final breakup of the family Buddenbrooks.

Here the literary text, the story told in it and its plot, are synthesized into one image that is not simply evocative of the content of the novel, but aims to represent its very essence.


 

Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh (Sunflowers)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
85X60 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of part of the correspondence between Vincent and Theo Van Gogh (letters 663 to 712. Arles, 18 August 1888 to 25 October 1888)– Original language (French)


 

Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh (Self Portrait)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
80X70 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of part of the correspondence between Vincent and Theo Van Gogh (letters 713 to 782. Paris, 27 October 1888 – St Remy de Provence, 18 June 1889)– Original language (French)


 

Tribute to Vincent Van Gogh (Iris)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
85X60 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of part of the correspondence between Vincent and Theo Van Gogh (letters 785 to 839. Arles, 25 June 1889 to 19 January 1890)– Original language (French)


 

The art of knowing yourself
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
50X50 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book of Arthur Schopenhauer– Original language
Category– Philosophy

Private collection

Technique – Handwriting of the whole book ‘The art of knowing yourself’ by Arthur Schopenhauer (German language)

Description of the painting – This work shows a very sturdy tree with wide branches and very deep and extended roots – almost wide as the branches above. The tree represents “ourselves”. The roots represent the inner part of us while the outside part of the tree, represents the outer side of ourselves. The message of this work is essentially the following: the more we deeply know ourselves (extent and depth of the roots) the more the wellness and solidity achieved appear on the external part of us (trunk and branches very large). Tonalities are deliberately dark/grey. It is evening / night and, above all, one is alone! Being alone, silent and apart is here intended as essential condition in order to have time to think, to question, to talk to ourselves and, therefore, to know ourselves.

This painting must necessarily be looked at and considered together with the work entitled “The art of being happy”.


The art of being happy
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
50X50 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book by Arthur Schopenhauer– Original language
Category– Philosophy

Private collection

Technique – Handwriting of the whole book ‘The art of being happy’ by Arthur Schopenhauer (German language)

Description of the painting – This work represents the logical follow-up of the work ‘The art of knowing yourself’, published in page… The tree (the same tree portraied in ‘The art of konowing yourself’) now appears enriched with leafs and colors. The sky is blu and the sun is yellow-gold. The colored leafs represent the “giving to the others the best part of ourselves”; In other words, the “giving of what each one of us is able to give, after one has reached the deep knowledge of itself-.

The final message that comes out from the analysis of the two paintings is that ‘you must first get to know yourself (work ‘The art of knowing yourself’) in order to be truly happy (work ‘The art of being happy’).


La corda pazza (sicilitudine)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
170X130 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book of Leonardo Sciascia– Original language
Material – Pens and paper
Category– Essay

About the bookLa corda pazza” is an essay written by Leonardo Sciascia and published in 1970. It includes 28 textes about Sicily, Sicilians and their way of being and attitude towards life.

Description of the picture – Important writers and artists have written and discussed about Sicilians’relation to life and the future, their fatalism that ultimately provides them an itchwhen compared with something new (a sort of allergy to change) and the inevitable acceptance of the reality of things, because for a Sicilian reality appears to be immutable if not by divine intervention. One of the most important connoisseurs of theSicilian approach, of the “Sicilitude” (sicilitudine, in italian), as he would have said if he was still alive, was Leonardo Sciascia, an important Sicilian intellectual and writer of the 20th Century, who in an interview with the French journalist Marcelle Padovani (data, Sicily as a metaphor) said: “The greatest sin of Sicily is and has always been to not believe in ideas. Here, it has never been believed that ideas move the world … this is what has prevented Sicily to move on foward: the belief that the world could never be different from how it has been.”

In this painting I tried to depict some themes that can be extrapolated from the concept expressed by Sciascia and that can be linked to the Sicilian “existentialism”, that particular approach to reality and life. A man is sitting (immobility) looking down,

almost to himself (fatal acceptance of given reality and of his present condition / failureto look ahead into the future for the good of himself and his descendants), with hisarms outstretched and the palms of his hands turned towards the sky (passive waitingfor improvements of his conditions (godsend) / prayer to the Lord, to the mercy and willof which, he puts his life). Behind the man, the vegetation and colors have bright andvibrant tones. This represents a prosperous and glorious far past of the island. As youget closer to the man (we come to the present) and continue further (you go into thefuture), the vegetation and colors become more arid; this to indicate a pessimistic viewon the Sicilian present state.


If this is a man (original work)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
137X120 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book of Primo Levi – Original language
Material – Pens and paper
Category–Memoir/Historical

About the book – “If this is a man” is a book of Primo Levi, an Italian Jew deported to the Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz in 1944. He was one of the few prisoners who survived to the camp and lived the rest of his life trying to spread as much as possible the story of his tragic experience. The book also represents a unique and direct witness of the degradation, humiliation and suppression of the prisoners in the concentration camp in Poland. Primo Levi committed suicide in 1987.

Description of the picture – A skull appears on a background in which are repeated, in several languages, the words “Ideology – Madness – Death”. The reference is to the existing connection between fanaticism and madness of those men who make of the ideologies (and religions) powerful tools of terror and death.

A/N (Author’s note) – By making this work I suddenly felt unconfortable with the controversial feeling whether it was really right or not to portray this story. Once done, few months later I’ve decided to destroy this work. I’ve scratched it in all its parts and my intention was to throw it away. Well, I also felt unconfortable with this intention and, at the end, I’ve decided to make 5 little works out of the original one (see pictures below). Two of these works (Cut 4 and 5) have been realized in cooperation with artist Adriana Franza, who is also my wife.


If this is a man (after its destruction)
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015


The Divine Comedy – Paradise
© Ivan Cangelosi, 2015
107X86 cm
Ink on paper
Technique – Handwriting of the whole book of Dante Alighieri– Original language
Material – Pens and paper
Category–Politics/Religion

About the Poem– The Divine Comedy” “is a poem by Dante Alighieri. Composed between 1304 and 1321, the Divine Comedy is considered by some critics as the greatest masterpiece of literature of all time. The poem is divided into three books called “cantiche” (Heel, Purgatory and Paradise , IT – Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso), each of which is composed of 33 lyrics (Canti) but hell who has 34.

Description of the painting – This artwork is a “stereogram”. The stereogram is a flat, two-dimensional image which gives an illusion of depth. The stereogram represented in this painting is a “random points stereogram” whose correct vision requires special techniques. By the so called “wall-eyed” technique (this technique consist of not focusing the observed object but rather focusing an imaginary point beyond the stereogram), you can view in depth a three-dimensional concentric circles. With the technique called “cross-eyed”, you can see the aforesaid 3D circles as coming out of the picture.” This artwork (together with the “Paradise” made in 2012) represents the first stereogram ever made by handwriting.


 

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